Posts tagged ‘horizontal’

December 16, 2012

Assignment 2: Elements Of Design

by Suzy Walker-Toye

For this assignment we were allowed to choose a subject for example ‘Flowers & Plants’, ‘Landscapes’ or ‘Street Details’ with which to show a group of photos with elements of design in them as specified by the headings below. The subject I chose was Underwater Macro Life.

 

1. Single Point dominating the composition:

The eye of this sleeping goat fish definitely dominates this composition.

Sleeping Goatfish eye

 

 

2. Two Points:

I was attracted to the little tendrils that spider out from each hole.

two holes in the surface of an orange sponge

 

 

3. Several points in a deliberate shape:

The eyes and knees of this mantis shrimp  (do mantis shrimp even have knees?) make an implied rectangle. I liked that the whole thing was enclosed in an actual circle (his hole) and a spot of light from the snoot I was using. Shapes within shapes.

Implied Rectangle

 

 

4. A combination of vertical and horizontal lines:

I was confused a little by this one because in the exercises for this the horizontals and verticals were split out into different pictures but this title implied both. So I shot all three versions. Horizontal, Vertical and Both.

Horizontal Vertical Horizontal and Vertical - inside a tunicate

 

 

5. Diagonals:

The diagonal lines of the crinoid lead you eye to the striking little crab.

Diagonal

 

 

6. Curves:

This was shot during daylight hours so I used a high shutter speed to control the ambient light to achieve the black background. I wanted to emphasise the curve of this whip coral to lead your eyes down to the very well camouflaged shrimp and a blue (water) background wouldn’t have worked as well.

Curves

 

 

7. Distinct, even if irregular shapes:

I used a snoot on my strobe to create a pool of heart shape light around this pair of harlequin shrimp enjoying a romantic meal for two of starfish legs.

Heart shaped

 

 

8. At least two kinds of implied triangle:

This decorator crab has three little polyps on his head making a nice implied triangle. And the eyes and shrimp of this coral grouper being cleaned make an implied inverted triangle. The groupers body is triangular too, more shapes within shapes.

Implied triangle 1

Implied triangle 2

 

 

9. Rhythm:

The pattern of this coral reminded me of a musical score.

Rhythm

 

 

10. Pattern:

This pattern of coral polyps looks as though it could go on forever.

Pattern

 

To see the Exifs etc for these images (as I know my tutor might like to do) you have to look at them in side show mode. Click any image below to begin, please bear in mind that my lighting is external and manually controlled so this would not be taken into account by the Exif.

November 13, 2012

Exercise: Horizontal and Vertical lines

by Suzy Walker-Toye

In this exercise on p76, we are encouraged to go out and make photographs or horizontal or vertical lines. I’ve talked about this a little in my PDF log (9th Nov entry) so I wont go into too much detail. Here are some images that shows verticals and horizontals

July 3, 2012

Exercise: Vertical and horizontal frames

by Suzy Walker-Toye

The exercise on p62 presupposes that most photographers will mainly choose pick horizontal format for their photo as a starting point (because in general its easier to take a horizontal photo with most cameras). It is designed to emphasise vertical compositions can be more pleasing in certain circumstances and not to struggle to fit everything into a horizontal frame. I find that with my iPhone and my underwater camera that it is actually the vertical that is my go-to format. Sometimes I shoot both formats when I either cannot decide or have started off in one format before deciding it’d look better there other way. I show here a range of subjects, some look better in horizontal and some look better in vertical. The exercise calls for 20 photos of each which seems a little overkill to me so apologies if this post takes a while to load, I didn’t put all 40 photos up but there are plenty to illustrate the point. I have tried to minimise this by only showing a few examples in full (with the explanations) and the rest in a gallery format.

This was one example underwater with a decorator crab where my default vertical just didn’t work so well:

In this case it was the opposite, when this little pink sea slug “stood” upwards the vertical format made a much more pleasing composition:

These trees in Namibia work equally well in vertical and horizontal because they are tall enough to work with the vertical and the extra tree balances out the horizontal format:

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